Rome and the Advantage of a Local Italian Tour Guide

Rome, one of the most gorgeous cities in Europe. Alive with history and tradition, the websites of the city make it a must see destination. When arranging a tour of famous sites, do not be fearful of hiring a tour guide looking for patrons along the road.


As you’re walking down the road or coming to a famed site such as the Forum, St. Peter’s Square, the Vatican, the Colosseum, or some other, it is difficult to prevent the approaching tour guides with their credentials dangling from their neck along with a flyer demonstrating how they could ensure you will have the tour of your lifetime. As a new visitor to Rome, I hunted out these folks. That is because a friend had visited the year prior and experienced first-hand the simplicity of dealing with the guides along with the wonderful tours they provided. With this previous understanding, there could have been a small unease and wonderment if these individuals could be trusted. My experience was they could be.


There are many advantages to hiring a local guide. First, my suggestion is not to get a digital guide, but to enlist the services of one that is an Italian native. The instruction they provide of the history of early times is unmatched. And, their promise of never having to stand in the lines and taking you immediately into the appeal is true. With tour guide credentials, they can bypass the lines and deliver their groups to front, past those individuals that chose to not choose a tour and enter the appeal by themselves.


This excursion will take us on a journey to Palatine Hill, with history and customs conveyed through the tales of an Italian indigenous. Our first stop revealed the remains of Romulus Palace on Palatine Hill which is the centermost of the Seven Hills of Rome. But, just the underground remained which was said to have housed servants and storage. As we stumbled on this ground steeped in history, we learned there are plenty of customs that arose in the early Roman times still spoke around and in use now. One of these deals with carrying out your spouse over the”brink”. During the time of Romulus, there were just guys in Rome, just those from the military. Romulus and his men wanted to begin a city but they needed women so they attracted neighboring people in for a”celebration” and treated them into wine and food. But more wine (Frugulini which is now outlawed) than food and Romulus and his guys ran off with the girls. Romulus picked up one girl and grabbed the line or wall of the palace. He cried and crossed the threshold, where he was safe and the girl was being carried to her new residence, which is used for weddings now.


As we walked towards the Forum, our guide talked to us about the one aqueduct from around 87 BC that still brings all of the water to Rome and to every one of the fountains in town. The water is very clean and passes through limestone. It was initially built to bring olive oil to the city. Romans would set the olive oil right into the water and it would rise to the surface, then when it approached the destination the Romans would skim it off the water. The olive oil was then used both to consume and bathe in. They’d pour olive oil all over their body, and then protect themselves in the sand and use a scraper to peel off it. Romans would be very clean, great smelling and hairless. That is how it was understood if someone needed money was when they bathed a whole lot it took off all of their hair. Another interesting fact we had been told is that Romans were on average just 4’6″ tall. Much smaller than we would imagine from the images we have seen and heard about along with the films made revealing this proud and imperial nation.


Another tradition our guide advised us of this is still talked about today arose too from ancient Roman times. When a man and woman would get married, then they would shake hands. A term still used now that’s taking their”hand in marriage”. Also, because a man and a girl would shake hands when they wed, two men would never shake in that way but instead would shake off. Men’s apparel of the time didn’t consist of sleeves. If a man wore sleeves they weren’t to be reliable” they’ve got something up their sleeve” which is a term still used today. That something was typically a knife. So Romans would squeeze the sleeve before vibration because if not, it was quite easy to shake off, hold on your opponent and hit with your free left hand in your sleeve, grab your knife, and stab the other man in the side murdering him.


Romans also had toilets that smashed, together with running water. The toilets were dark and badly lit so that you couldn’t see when you were in that room. Next to the toilet was the toilet paper of their time, a loofah on a pole, and everyone shared it. If you grabbed the wrong end you got a couple of! On occasion, the loofah was gone off the end of the pole and you would stick yourself using the brief pointy end. So to curse at other Romans they’d say”Go grab a stick on the brief end”. This could be in nature telling someone to push it.


After the history lesson, we now move back to the palace that is said to have been ruined in an earthquake. Formerly, it is thought to have been 6 stories high. Here were ruins to our abandoned that were probably apartments for the wealthier Romans. Across from them on our right is where a”health club” would have been. An open-air area where the guys would go to keep fit and watch the girls go by to go down to the place where the stores were. To buy items, most Romans would pay with salt.

great smelling and hairless. That is how it was understood if someone needed money was when they bathed a whole lot it took off all of their hair. Another interesting fact we had been told is that Romans were on average just 4’6″ tall. Much smaller than we would imagine from the images we have seen and heard about along with the films made revealing this proud and imperial nation.
Another tradition our guide advised us of this is still talked about today arose too from ancient Roman times. When a man and woman would get married, then they would shake hands. A term still used now that’s taking their”hand in marriage”. Also, because a man and a girl would shake hands when they wed, two men would never shake in that way but instead would shake off. Men’s apparel of the time didn’t consist of sleeves. If a man wore sleeves they weren’t to be reliable” they’ve got something up their sleeve” which is a term still used today. That something was typically a knife. So Romans would squeeze the sleeve before vibration because if not, it was quite easy to shake off, hold on your opponent and hit with your free left hand in your sleeve, grab your knife, and stab the other man in the side murdering him.


Romans also had toilets that smashed, together with running water. The toilets were dark and badly lit so that you couldn’t see when you were in that room. Next to the toilet was the toilet paper of their time, a loofah on a pole, and everyone shared it. If you grabbed the wrong end you got a couple of! On occasion, the loofah was gone off the end of the pole and you would stick yourself using the brief pointy end. So to curse at other Romans they’d say”Go grab a stick on the brief end”. This could be in nature telling someone to push it.


After the history lesson, we now move back to the palace that is said to have been ruined in an earthquake. Formerly, it is thought to have been 6 stories high. Here were ruins to our abandoned that were probably apartments for the wealthier Romans. Across from them on our right is where a”health club” would have been. An open-air area where the guys would go to keep fit and watch the girls go by to go down to the place where the stores were. To buy items, most Romans would pay with salt.

Visit http://www.tripindicator.com/rome-colosseum-underground-night-tours-tickets.html for information about Colosseum Underground, Colosseum Underground Tickets, Colosseum Underground Tours, Colosseum Underground Night Tours, Colosseum Underground, etc.

For more detailed information about Colosseum Travel, check out at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colosseum

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